Technology in the Latin Classroom

More Kahoot Jumble Ideas

Long time, no blog! I don’t really have an excuse. I was going to say that I went to Iceland, but I went to Iceland before my last blog post, so… foiled by my own dang self.

Anyway!

A few months ago, I wrote a post about the possible uses of Kahoot Jumble as a post-reading activity. I’ve had a few ideas since then about how we can use this feature of Kahoot; I’ll just list them below. Again, I don’t think Jumble is as useful as it could be. You should be able to use regular Kahoot questions and Jumble questions in the same quiz, but alas, I don’t run the world or any part of it.

Any type of sequencing activity should work well with Jumble, including:

  • Putting the days of the week, the months, the seasons, etc. in order
  • Putting tenses in order (for example: pluperfect, perfect/imperfect, present, future)
  • Ordering characters in a story from youngest to oldest or vice versa
  • Putting positive, comparative, and superlative adjectives in order
    • I think you have to have 4 things to order in each question, so I would do this by using “non adjective.” For example: non iratus, iratus, iratior, iratissimus
  • Putting events in logical order
    • For example: I wake up. I take a shower. I put on clothes. I leave for school.
  • Putting historical events in order
  • Putting phrases in order according to transition words
    • For example: First, I get home. Second, I do my homework. Next, I watch TV. Finally, I go to bed.
  • Putting meals or courses in order
  • Putting numbers (cardinal or ordinal) in order
  • If you can find a GIF of someone doing something in a recognizable order, you can upload the GIF as part of the question. Then you could have students arrange the sentences to accurately reflect the order in which the person does that thing. (Could that be a more convoluted sentence? I’m sorry – I’m tired!)

I would use the quiz to target a specific sequence or set of vocabulary words, like days of the week or transition words, and do no more than 10 questions in a quiz (otherwise it becomes easily tiresome and repetitive).

I’m sure there are thousands of other ways to use this feature – let me know your thoughts!

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