Breakout Edu · Latin Club/Junior Classical League

A Quick Idea for a Breakout Edu Crossword Clue

I am 200% sure someone else has already come up with this idea, but I wanted to write it down before I forgot, and it might help someone else.

I am always looking for new clues for Breakout Edu, and as I was making a vocabulary crossword for one of my classes, I had an idea about using these activities in a Breakout game.

Here’s my initial thought:

  1. Make a crossword puzzle, either by hand or using a site like Armored Penguin. Here’s a link to the one I just made that inspired me to make this post.
  2. Figure out where in the game the puzzle will appear. Is it your very first clue? Is it inside a 3-digit lockbox or another box that students have to open? If you can create digital crosswords, do students scan a QR code to get there?
  3. Figure out how you are going to use the puzzle to lead to a clue. Maybe…
    1. Students find a clue that says something like 1,6,13,16. They will think they should just add the numbers up, but they are really looking for the letters that appear in the box of that number. This can lead them to a password-protected document or website or it could open a word lock – just make sure that you have the correct letters on the word lock to make this work.
    2. You could circle certain boxes on the puzzle and somehow have these represent a password or lock solution. I’m not sure at this moment how you would let the kids know what order to put the letters in, but you could always have them do trial and error.

Armored Penguin also lets you create info-gap crosswords, where Student A has one half of the crossword and Student B has the other half, so it could be fun to give them one half of the crossword early in the game and the other half later in the game.

Just some thoughts!

Breakout Edu · Latin Club/Junior Classical League

How I Create Breakout Edu Games

The Breakout game we did at GJCL Convention was a hit (I think). We had to limit it to 24 people per session, and when we showed up half an hour before the session to set up, we saw that there were already 24 kids (and apparently they had been there for some time), and they were turning other kids away to keep their spot in line. Awesome!

I had a couple of people ask me if I would send them some info about how to do these games, which is why I am writing this post. A couple of things to keep in mind: I am not a “pro” at this (having only written a few games so far), and there are many things I want/need to improve with this kind of activity.

My step-by-step process of writing a Breakout game is below. If you want to “follow along” with a real game I wrote, here is the Google Drive folder for the game I ran at GJCL Convention. You are welcome to use or adapt this game in any way you want; I took some portions of this game from games published on the Breakout site.

  1. I figure out what I want the theme/story of the game to be. For the game I did at Convention, I was aiming for something that would have mass appeal, so I went with mythology. I am doing a game for my Latin I classes for final exam review, and that one is pretty much just reviewing what we’ve done this year.
    1. If you are teaching novellas or other extended stories, it would be really cool to do a Breakout that not only asks about the story but simulates or extends an aspect of the plot (e.g. to help X character find Y thing that she wants, you must open the box with all the locks on it).
  2. I start a Google Doc and make a list of all the locks and materials I have access to or want to use in the game. Our school library has enough locks and materials for 3 Breakout kits (our librarians are awesome), but I have started putting together my own piece by piece. I will write another post some day about sourcing materials for kits.
    Anyway! We don’t actually have any Breakout-branded kits; all of ours are “open-sourced,” meaning we got them from Amazon and the like. I generally have access to the following:

    1. A “Breakout box” (large box that can fit a hasp on it – I use a metal toolbox in my personal kit similar to this one)
    2. Hasp
    3. Invisible ink and UV flashlight (this is the flashlight I have bought)
    4. 5-letter word lock
    5. 4-digit number lock similar to this
    6. Directional lock
    7. Small 3-digit lock box
    8. I have also bought 3-digit number locks (similar here) for myself; I don’t think (I could be wrong) that these are in our school kits
    9. Key lock
    10. I bought a set of 4 very cheap ($3 each) plastic toolboxes at Walmart that can fit a single lock (not a hasp). I use these in the games too.
  3. I think about what I want each lock to do and where I want it to be. You want a decent number (4 or so) of locks on the hasp, but I also like for them to open at least one other box, like the 3-digit lockbox or the cheap plastic toolbox, in addition to unlocking the hasp. Remember that the more locks you have, the more time the game will take.
    1. I like for the lockbox/toolbox to have the UV light inside it as well as some other goodies they will need for solving further clues. Think QR codes, flash drives, new messages they have to decode, etc.
    2. I also think about the type of information that will be required for students to unlock a lock. Take the directional lock, for example. If you use it, you need to have a clue that involves students finding directions or arrows in some way. You can have students use the UV light to find arrows that are written in a certain order; you can have them find the literal words “left,” “right,” “up,” and “down” as part of a clue; you can do something that requires them to draw arrows or pay attention to the order in which they see something (hard to explain, but the directional lock clue in the Escape the Underworld game linked in this post does this).
  4. I make my games very linear, so I start with “Step One” in the Google Doc. Step One should have everything the students need to get to Step Two. This is the Google Doc I did for Escape the Underworld; go to page 2 to see the steps.
    1. Step One for this game was a little too hard. You want it to be something that students can figure out fairly quickly and that builds their momentum for the rest of the game. You want the right amount of struggle so that when they get to Step Two, they’re excited, but you don’t want them to lose steam.
    2. For the first clue, I like using acrostic poems or messages, but if you play a lot of games with your students, they will figure out it’s your signature move. I’ve had an idea to do a QR code cut up into puzzle pieces as the first clue, but I don’t know if it would scan the same when put back together.
  5. After Step One, I go to Step Two. Well, duh, I know. But what I mean by this is I have to think about how what they solved in Step One will get them to Step Two, then so on. Now that they have solved the puzzle in Step One, what are they going to do with that solution?
    1. I try to get the whole gist of the game down before I go back and really flesh out the clues. If you look at the review game I’m writing for my Latin I students for their final, for example, I don’t have everything hammered out, but I do have an idea of what I want to do with each clue. I will figure out the exact details later.
      Breakout Edu screenshot

Beyond that, there isn’t much to it in the way of planning. I do keep two principles in mind when planning the games, and these have helped me a lot (after some trial and error running other games I got from the Breakout website):

  • Limit the number of “around-the-room” clues. I ran a couple of games from the Breakout site that involved the extensive hiding of flashdrives under objects, writing on posters with invisible ink, etc. These didn’t work as well as other games for a couple of reasons. For one, no matter how much you tell the kids “stay within X physical boundaries,” they are going to be able to see what the other kids are doing, and if one group is running all over their quadrant of the room looking under desks and bookshelves, so will the other kids. It might be fun for them, but it strips the game of its problem-solving nature, especially if they just randomly find something they weren’t meant to find quite yet. (sigh. this happened to me in a recent game, and it kind of ruined the experience.)
    Instead of doing the “hide-the-object” types of clues, I try to use a lot of digital clues: QR codes, tinyurl links, and the like. If you use password-protected options, even better. I also like putting the physical clues inside the 3-digit lockbox or the cheap plastic toolbox – that way you can have them physically manipulate something like a puzzle or a matching set while still requiring them to do the problem-solving to get there.
  • Spread the clues out. By this I mean delay the gratification. Students might find something in Step Two that they can’t even use until Step Five; or even if they somehow get into the Step Three lockbox by some stroke of luck (it will happen), make it so they can’t do anything with the materials inside until they actually solve the puzzle they were supposed to solve or until they get to a later step. Make them think about the collection of materials in front of them, especially the ones they get from opening an envelope, a Padlet link, the lockbox, etc. What can we use right now? What do we need to put aside? The process of determining utility in a group is really powerful for their critical thinking muscles.

For more resources: I think one of the best ideas is to look at some of the games that already exist and either run one of those with your students or adapt the ideas from them (that’s what I do).

Where to find games:

That’s all for now. Later this week, I plan to write a post about clue ideas that I’ve had rattling around in my brain, and then at some point I will write a general info dump of tips for running the games.

Let me know if you have questions!

Breakout Edu · Latin Club/Junior Classical League · Technology in the Latin Classroom

Two Alternatives to Password-Protected Word Docs for Breakout Edu

Could that title be longer?

I’m planning a Breakout Edu game for GJCL Convention this year, and one of the things I kept running into trouble with was wanting to use a flashdrive for a password-protected Word doc. This is fine when we do these Breakout games at school; I am working with my own students, I know that they have devices that have Word, etc.

But at GJCL, we would run into a few problems. The big one? Nobody would have a device that could open a flashdrive. The kids there will have phones, though, and Rock Eagle does have Wi-Fi, so I’ve been trying to come up with ways to have our puzzles that would normally lead to a password-protected Word doc lead elsewhere on the Internet.

I really only had two requirements: 1) it needs to be easy to use, and 2) it needs to be free. This is what I came up with:

  • Padlet. I have used Padlet (and password-protected Padlets, at that) in class before and loved it, so why not incorporate it into a Breakout game? If you’re looking for a direct one-to-one replacement for a password-protected Word doc, I think Padlet’s got you covered, since you can put just about anything in one. One of the big pluses that you get with using Padlet for Breakout is that you can store multiple clues on the same page – but in discrete blocks. You can adjust the settings so that students can only view the Padlet, but I think it would be cool to do something where students have to drag the little Padlet notes to be in the correct order to reveal something to propel the game. You could even use the background image as part of a clue or puzzle.
Padlet setting the password
Setting the password

Padlet clues

  • Quizlet. You can password-protect Quizlet sets, even with a free account. I like the idea of using a Quizlet set in a Breakout game as a codebreaking aide (if, for example, students have discovered a set of numbers, they can use the Quizlet set to “translate” those numbers into letters to unlock a word lock).

I’m sure there are many other websites and apps that can be used for password-protecting material. I think Tumblr allows for password-protected blogs, but if you’re playing at school, it’s likely blocked by the Wi-Fi.

Hopefully the Breakout at GJCL goes well! It will be my first time hosting a workshop, period, and my first time leading a Breakout with students who aren’t mine. Wish me luck!

Latin Club/Junior Classical League · National Latin Honor Society

Latin Club Christmas Party Recap

christmas-party-cropped
Some of the gifts from the party

Last year, we didn’t have a Christmas party for Latin Club, but this year, with our record 110 students registered as club members, I thought it would be nice to have one. We ended up doing a cookie/candy swap (think Secret Santa, but sugary things only) with a $5 limit.

It was a huge success! We had around 50 students RSVP (so they could participate in the swap), and more showed up for the party itself. We held the party on a Friday afternoon immediately after school, and it was over in about 30-45 minutes (the perfect length, in my book).

I tried to let the students do most of the planning and setup/cleanup – here’s what worked for us if you’re thinking about doing something similar next year.

  • We set the date a few weeks in advance and made the RSVP deadline a Monday for the Friday party.
  • One of our Latin Club secretaries made the Google Form we used for the RSVPs. The questions asked:
    • Name, grade
    • Will you participate in the cookie/candy swap?
    • What cookie/candy do you want?
    • Note: next year, we will take out the “do you want to participate” question, since the whole point of the RSVP form is for people who want to participate in the swap. We also need to add on a question about allergies and dietary restrictions – two of our students who have severe, life-threatening nut allergies didn’t include this information in their responses, but their Secret Santas needed to know, especially because one of these students wanted chocolate chip cookies.
  • Another secretary made the Sign-Up Genius for our Latin Club Leadership members to bring food and drinks. This included cookies, candy canes, popcorn, pretzels, etc. I brought the serving bowls and platters.
  • I sent out the Secret Santa assignments via email. This was the most labor-intensive part for me. Next year, I need to include a tactful reminder to only buy the gifts requested, since we had at least one student get something they didn’t ask for (it was actually something they really didn’t like).

On the day of the party, students brought their food and gifts to my classroom. They dropped their things off on two carts we borrowed from the maintenance crew. One thing I was a stickler about was making sure the gift was packaged at least minimally (I brought gift bags, tissue paper, gift tags, and bows from home); at the very least, they need to put their “To” and “From” on the gift tag. We didn’t do a big ceremony for the swap, since there were so many kids – we just trusted them to only grab the gift labeled for them off the table.

We held the party in a small section of our cafeteria that can be partitioned off. When we were done, a group of our National Latin Honor Society students took care of the clean-up so they could earn thirty minutes of their required two hours of service hours to the Latin faculty.

Like I said, this was a huge hit. The kids all had a great time, and it was a nice way to spend some down time with them. Next year, we might incorporate some charity aspect into the party (bringing a high-need item for a homeless shelter or a canned good with their gift, for example); it depends on what the kids want to do.

I hope you’ve had a wonderful holiday season – see you next year!

Latin Club/Junior Classical League

Structuring our JCL (Latin Club) Chapter

First post! Welcome!

I wanted to write something about Latin Club (JCL) for my first post, since I find very little about it out there on the Internet. There are tons of great Latin pedagogy blogs, but it’s hard to find ideas for Latin Club specifically. I hope this helps if you’re thinking about building a JCL chapter.

Last year (my first year teaching), we had a fairly active JCL chapter. Our club held semi-regular meetings where we watched movies, listened to Elvis songs in Latin (fabulous!), ate lots of bad-for-you food, and spent time together. We had about 50 students or so registered in Latin Club, which meant about 15 or 20 who would regularly come to meetings. We also attended the GJCL Convention, bringing about 20 students – a big success for our first time attending as a school!

Fast forward to this year: instead of 50 registered JCL students, we have 110. Instead of 3 students attending Fall Forum (like last year), we had 14. I imagine we will have at least 30 students attending GJCL Convention in the spring. On top of this, we’re expanding the activities we’re doing as a club: a tailgate for Parochial Schools Night, a Christmas party with a Secret Santa-esque cookie/candy swap, a Google Expeditions “tour,” a Breakout Edu experience, and more.

Organizing all of this would be impossible without my two Latin teacher colleagues, our fantastic department head, and the entire team of administrators, maintenance men, and clerical staff at our school. But the other key ingredient is our leadership team.

Last year, we had officers for Latin Club, but we (read: I) didn’t have much for them to do. This year, we structured our leadership team and officer positions differently. Here’s how it works:

  1. We have Latin Club, and within that, we have a group of students called Latin Club Leadership (LCL). The only requirement to be in LCL is that you sign up for it and you come to the meetings; this means students from freshmen to seniors can feel ownership in the club.
  2. Within LCL, we have a team of officers. Our officer positions are pretty simple:
    1. Co-consuls (one junior, one senior)
    2. Secretary
    3. Historian
      This year, we have two secretaries and three historians. We opened the officer positions to anybody who wanted to claim them, so we have all four grades represented on the officer team.

So how does this work? We expect all LCL members to attend LCL meetings, where we plan the next general meeting (especially if it’s something that will involve lots of resources and/or food) and any upcoming special events, like parties or Works of Mercy (a service requirement of all students at our school). I run these meetings now, but in the future, I plan to hand the reins over to the co-consuls. Our secretaries keep the minutes in Google Docs and create Sign-Up Geniuses (and in the future, Google Forms) for upcoming events, and our historians meet to plan their ongoing project of creating the scrapbook.

I like this structure a lot. It gives the students a healthy amount of responsibility while leaving the Big Stuff (keeping track of money, registering our school for JCL, etc.) for me to do. Plus, even our freshmen feel involved in Latin from the very beginning, something that’s incredibly important to the three of us Latin teachers.

How is your club structured?