Technology in the Latin Classroom

Working with Prepositions

We are working on Stage 14 in my Latin 2 CP class right now, and we are having a lot of fun with prepositions and the cases they take. I was trying to think of a way to get students to understand how prepositions work in Latin (and just to learn what they mean), so I came up with this series of activities, and it’s worked really well these past 2 days:

  • After explaining prepositions that need ablative objects vs. accusative objects, we did a quick round of “Prepositions Charades.” I wrote about 10 phrases out on some cards using two objects we have in our classroom: a Beanie Baby lion (leo) and our flat-top rolling desks (mensa). The phrases were things like “sub leone” and “in mensā.” Students volunteered to act out two phrases while the rest of the class wrote the phrase they were acting out on our mini white-boards. They had a lot of fun with this one, and it was quick and easy.
  • Then I let them work in pairs to take at least 7 pictures with prepositional phrases – basically doing what we had just done, but creating the phrases on their own. They were allowed to use any item in the classroom, so the pictures involved a lot of books and chairs, but some students also used my stress pears (pear-shaped stress balls provided by Pear Deck) and some of my Funko Pop figures. They inserted the photos and the captions into a Google Slides template that I made for them and distributed via PowerSchool Learning (formerly Haiku, our LMS).
  • When we meet again on Thursday, I will have a Pear Deck presentation prepared for them featuring most of their photos. Depending on the photo, students will write the prepositional phrase they think is depicted or answer questions about the photo. The students seem excited about this one; they love seeing their work displayed for others, even “just” their own classmates.

This has been a pretty simple lesson, but they are enjoying it, and it seems to be helping them get the hang of how prepositional phrases are structured.

Examples of student work below!

pro sella
liber est prō sellā.
in mensa
stylus est in mēnsā.
in mensa 2
Super Mutant est in mēnsā.
sub toga
puella est sub togā. We tend to call all clothing a “toga” in this class.
pro pede
cibus est prō pede.
Breakout Edu · Latin Club/Junior Classical League · Technology in the Latin Classroom

Two Alternatives to Password-Protected Word Docs for Breakout Edu

Could that title be longer?

I’m planning a Breakout Edu game for GJCL Convention this year, and one of the things I kept running into trouble with was wanting to use a flashdrive for a password-protected Word doc. This is fine when we do these Breakout games at school; I am working with my own students, I know that they have devices that have Word, etc.

But at GJCL, we would run into a few problems. The big one? Nobody would have a device that could open a flashdrive. The kids there will have phones, though, and Rock Eagle does have Wi-Fi, so I’ve been trying to come up with ways to have our puzzles that would normally lead to a password-protected Word doc lead elsewhere on the Internet.

I really only had two requirements: 1) it needs to be easy to use, and 2) it needs to be free. This is what I came up with:

  • Padlet. I have used Padlet (and password-protected Padlets, at that) in class before and loved it, so why not incorporate it into a Breakout game? If you’re looking for a direct one-to-one replacement for a password-protected Word doc, I think Padlet’s got you covered, since you can put just about anything in one. One of the big pluses that you get with using Padlet for Breakout is that you can store multiple clues on the same page – but in discrete blocks. You can adjust the settings so that students can only view the Padlet, but I think it would be cool to do something where students have to drag the little Padlet notes to be in the correct order to reveal something to propel the game. You could even use the background image as part of a clue or puzzle.
Padlet setting the password
Setting the password

Padlet clues

  • Quizlet. You can password-protect Quizlet sets, even with a free account. I like the idea of using a Quizlet set in a Breakout game as a codebreaking aide (if, for example, students have discovered a set of numbers, they can use the Quizlet set to “translate” those numbers into letters to unlock a word lock).

I’m sure there are many other websites and apps that can be used for password-protecting material. I think Tumblr allows for password-protected blogs, but if you’re playing at school, it’s likely blocked by the Wi-Fi.

Hopefully the Breakout at GJCL goes well! It will be my first time hosting a workshop, period, and my first time leading a Breakout with students who aren’t mine. Wish me luck!

Technology in the Latin Classroom

More Kahoot Jumble Ideas

Long time, no blog! I don’t really have an excuse. I was going to say that I went to Iceland, but I went to Iceland before my last blog post, so… foiled by my own dang self.

Anyway!

A few months ago, I wrote a post about the possible uses of Kahoot Jumble as a post-reading activity. I’ve had a few ideas since then about how we can use this feature of Kahoot; I’ll just list them below. Again, I don’t think Jumble is as useful as it could be. You should be able to use regular Kahoot questions and Jumble questions in the same quiz, but alas, I don’t run the world or any part of it.

Any type of sequencing activity should work well with Jumble, including:

  • Putting the days of the week, the months, the seasons, etc. in order
  • Putting tenses in order (for example: pluperfect, perfect/imperfect, present, future)
  • Ordering characters in a story from youngest to oldest or vice versa
  • Putting positive, comparative, and superlative adjectives in order
    • I think you have to have 4 things to order in each question, so I would do this by using “non adjective.” For example: non iratus, iratus, iratior, iratissimus
  • Putting events in logical order
    • For example: I wake up. I take a shower. I put on clothes. I leave for school.
  • Putting historical events in order
  • Putting phrases in order according to transition words
    • For example: First, I get home. Second, I do my homework. Next, I watch TV. Finally, I go to bed.
  • Putting meals or courses in order
  • Putting numbers (cardinal or ordinal) in order
  • If you can find a GIF of someone doing something in a recognizable order, you can upload the GIF as part of the question. Then you could have students arrange the sentences to accurately reflect the order in which the person does that thing. (Could that be a more convoluted sentence? I’m sorry – I’m tired!)

I would use the quiz to target a specific sequence or set of vocabulary words, like days of the week or transition words, and do no more than 10 questions in a quiz (otherwise it becomes easily tiresome and repetitive).

I’m sure there are thousands of other ways to use this feature – let me know your thoughts!

Reading Strategies · Technology in the Latin Classroom

Kahoot Jumble

As you probably know, Kahoot is incredibly popular with students. I had no idea what it was when I started teaching, but I use it on a semi-regular basis now, usually for vocabulary. (Here is an example of one of those for CLC Stage 6.)

Kahoot recently introduced a new type of quiz: Jumble. With Kahoot Jumble, students reorganize blocks, which can contain words, events, etc., into the correct order. Truth be told, I think this feature has limited use as a standalone quiz. For real functionality, I think the Kahoot team should allow you to create quizzes with multiple types of questions: Jumble, multiple-choice, and whatever else is on the horizon. But that’s not the point of this post. 🙂

I can see Jumble being a great way to do post-reading with Latin students, and I think this is something that Latin teachers of all pedagogical stripes (CI, grammar/translation, hybrid – which is kind of what I am) can use.

There are two main things I foresee myself doing with Kahoot Jumble questions: put the words in the sentence in the correct order, and put the events in the correct order. I did this in the quick Jumble I threw together to get comfortable with how the whole thing works. That Jumble is for the Stage 1 story “Cerberus.”

Here are some screenshots of the quiz:

Caecilius est in horto.jpg

cerberus-events

Ultimately, I think option #2 (put the events in order) is more useful for us as teachers and for our students’ interaction with the text. Option #1 works well for that very first stage of CLC, if that’s what you’re using, when the sentences are four words long. Option #2, however, lets you assess students’ comprehension of the text. For those of you out there who are reading novellas (I see you on Twitter, amici et amicae!), this could be a great ten-minute activity for post-reading of a passage.

The big con here is that, as far as I can tell, you are limited to four boxes of text, and those boxes of text have a character limit. This might not even be a con for many of us – it might just be a way to make us more “creative” in the ways we ask students to think about the text.